Football vs. Affluence

I have nothing against people with lots of money.

Okay, maybe I do.  Forgive me, please.

It’s not that I don’t think that he or she has a right to that money–I’m an American through and through.  If you work for that check, hey, it’s yours.  And if your parents worked for that check and gave it to you, hey, it’s still yours.  You have a right to your money and I have a right to mine.

I have a problem with “rich” people who are also high on themselves.  Just because you have more money than I do doesn’t mean you’re better than I am.  You’re not.

On the flip side of that, just because I have less money–dude, I’m a filmmaker–doesn’t mean I’m better.  Get off your high horse you artists out there.

So.  Why am I talking about money?  I’ve been filming high school football games.

The first week, I filmed at a school whose media booth was literally falling apart.  I mean, there were parts of the floor that were so cracked I was afraid to set down my back pack.  Or my foot.  The stadium was modest, but well-cared for and well-filled, despite the stifling heat.  Really, they pushed the kickoff back an hour because of the heat.

This suburb in my city isn’t the most affluent.  Okay, they struggle a bit.  I think of the residents as average, but I come from one of the lowest income areas of Kansas City.  Here’s the thing:  This high school cares about their football team.  I’m sure they were instructed in the game to the best of the school’s ability.  The team didn’t lack uniforms or equipment.  The game was the event, nothing else.

The 2nd week I filmed at a school that intimidated me with its sheer size.  I mean, the media booth was HUGE and brand new and amazing.  Except there was this window that refused to open and then it refused to stay up….Anyway, this was an affluent suburb.  The kinda place where everybody drives a new car and sends their kids to dance and band and JC Penny and whatever else and thinks nothing of it.  Even with all those dance outfits that cost like $75 for one performance.

It’s okay to have that kinda money.  Really.  Money isn’t happiness or fulfillment or success necessarily.  A “poor” person can be perfectly content with life.

But man, the contrast with the first school was so startling that I spent a majority of the game thinking about money and how it changes things.  How it changes people.  You know how you have a group of people who are all middle to lower income and none of them really think about it–even if the level of income is fairly wide.

But then you have a group of high to higher income people and everybody has to show off their nice clothes or their fancy house or their car or their high school football stadium.  And you start to see the pettiness of it all.

Remember, I’m just the videographer.  I just document.  I can’t see into these people’s hearts or thoughts.  I don’t know any of them.  All I know is what I see. And what I saw was two schools from totally different suburbs of one of the most stereotyped cities in America and the vast difference money looked like.

It made me think, do we lower income people have a poor view on higher income people because we judge them only on what we can see?  Like, “This team is gonna be better because their media booth is newer?”  OR  “This team is gonna be bad because the school doesn’t have the money to repair a dangerous floorboard?”

I probably biased you immediately by making the title “Football vs. Affluence” like affluence changes anything.  Football is football and if you can play, you can play.  If you want it there isn’t anything, not even money, that’s gonna hold you back.

I’ve posted my filmmaking story on here and how a lot of people told me I would never make it.  I couldn’t afford the “best” college or the “best” camera or the most amount of time to just make films and not work.  Didn’t matter.  Really.  Money doesn’t change determination, talent, proficiency, and passion.

Rich or poor.  Whatever.

Yeah, there’s a difference.  Yeah, I can see it.  But it’s only as important as you make it.  Remember the group of high and higher income people and their weird need to impress each other?

I ain’t got that need.

Let’s play ball, guys.

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DP…DOP

I have this friend, ya’ll.  He’s only been a friend since maybe August last year.  And even then, we didn’t talk until….November?  We bonded over going to the same Owl City concert.

Here he is:

DSC06856

Why am I writing about this friend?  Well, ya’ll, he’s my DP.  Director of Photography.  He’s taken on the job without complaint and without ceasing.  He’s met with me a dozen times to work pre-production and then filming.  He’s guided, critiqued, encouraged, protected, advised, and made me laugh a lot at myself and other drama.  This is my friend.

mine from filming

We are filmmakers.  It’s not easy to be a filmmaker.  It’s not that hard either, so don’t go feeling sorry for us.  We love what we do and we get to do it, so we’re ahead of most of the planet.

Sometimes it can be a lonely job.  Editing, for example, is me sitting alone in front of my computer for hours.  And hours.  And hours.

Sometimes it can be a stressful job, especially when you’re independent and have no money.  Actors quit the day of or the day before.  Or crew gets tired of working for food and just doesn’t reply to messages anymore.

That’s okay.

Why?  Because I’m blessed with my DP.  And the rest of my crew, who surprise me over and over with their upbeat attitudes and eagerness to help.

THANK YOU.

Now you, reader, go out and find a crew.  Whether you work as an engineer, an interpreter, an artist (you understand the money issue), a dancer, a lawn mower (lonely job too), a plumber, a dentist (yes, even dentists), or an IRS agent, you need a crew.  People to back you when you don’t back yourself.

(DOP is the British way of saying DP.)